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Unraveling Autoimmune Challenges: 6 Books That Enlightened Me:  (4 of 5) Interwoven Wisdom Books: A blog series

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Introduction

As stated in my first blog in my Interwoven Wisdom Books blog series, I took the advice of How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Readings by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren. I combined knowledge from many different books. (1 of 5 in series)

I took Albert Einstein’s advice to think irrationally (Part 2 of series) and to use my imagination (Part 3 of series). I decided to search for common ground. We always hear how everything is connected to everything else. Well, I used these six books to search for connections in my health. I gained a key takeaway from each book. By combining knowledge from these various books, I was led to new possibilities and answers.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

1. Living Gluten Free for Dummies by Danna Korn

I came across this book when I was trying to look for a natural diet solution for my autistic son. I had found on the internet how children like this could benefit from a gluten free casein free diet.

It was a relatively new concept, and I couldn’t find any books at the time about both. But I did find this one. As I read it, I saw parts of my medical story and my mother’s story on those pages. I was in disbelief. How could this be possible? I wondered. I tried it out. I was shocked at the rapid elimination of symptoms in members of my household.

I followed this diet for three years. I also avoided dairy, eggs, soy, peanuts, wine, and at a certain point almost all foods. It seemed the ‘healthier’ I ate, the more allergic I became though. And just because it was safe one day, didn’t mean it was safe a different day. 

There was even a point when I could eat broccoli and I could eat cauliflower, but I could not eat cauliflower and broccoli together without my mouth going numb and starting to have slurred speech. It was scary. Nonetheless,  I don’t think I could have gotten better if I hadn’t followed this gluten free diet for a season. I no longer need to follow this diet. (This baffled my doctors.)

Not only did I learn how to modify my diet through this book, but it made me realize how such a small amount mattered. In order for an item to be considered gluten free, according to the Food and Drug Administration, it had to contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. A tiny amount.

This had mean thinking, “How could such a small amount make such a big difference?” Could it be more about the energy field of it?

Interwoven Wisdom Books: A Blog Series Lessons from Einstein: Autoimmune Answers through Irrational Thinking Part 4 of 5

2. The Body’s Many Cries for Water by F. Batmanghelidj, MD.

I found this book intriguing, frustrating, and eye-opening. Eye-opening because I had no idea so many people did not drink water! I understand there are arguments about the correct amount of water, but some drank none. Wow! At the time, I averaged 2-3 quarts of water a day. Did it help? Not really. Not like the book was saying it should.

It did get me to thinking though. Was it the water itself or was it the minerals in the water? Was I getting enough water but not enough minerals? The case studies that are shared are impressive. Believable too. But why not me? Why were some people able to do so much better with an answer as simple as ‘drink some water’? Could a solution really be simple?

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

3. NAET: Say Good-bye to Your Allergies by Devi S. Nambudripad, MD

This book was my first introduction to body meridians. I have to admit, I actually had a little chuckle just now when I think back to the first time I read this book. I threw it! I’ve never done that before.

Allow me to explain. As I was reading through this book, it was explaining how to narrow down what parts of your body were causing you problems. She explained how understanding what is called a body meridian clock can help with diagnosing. Depending on how you felt during different parts of the day, it could suggest to you what nutrients you were low in and/or what organs your body was struggling with. According to her calculations, the only part of my body working properly was my urinary bladder! (Little did I know it was accurate. ☹)

I learned so much from this book and referenced it frequently. What she figured out, she figured out by accident as well. She had health problems and accidentally figured out a fix during a point of desperation. Her method works for many people and though it did not work for me, it did help me learn many things.

Realizing it was all about energy caused me to be open to the idea of homeopathy. This in turn caused me to try homeopathy. When I realized homeopathy was all about wave cancelling…oh boy! It made sense. But did it make it work for me? Yes and no. It continually did, until it didn’t.

Interwoven Wisdom Books: A Blog Series Lessons from Einstein: Autoimmune Answers through Irrational Thinking Part 4 of 5

4. The Gift of Dyslexia by Ronald D. Davis and Eldon M. Braun

This would count as one of those books that How to Read a Book was referring to when it said to read a book unrelated to your problem you were stuck on and it may very well be the missing piece you were looking for. Since I was homeschooling my kids, and it seemed like all of them were dyslexic, I gave this recommended book a try. I was amazed.

In a nutshell, it explained how the mind of a dyslexic does not think like someone without the problem. But he didn’t end it there. He went on to show how you could train the mind to think within given boundaries to make it possible to consistently see the same thing each time.

I was impressed. It seemed so weird doing the suggestions in the book, but they worked! I saw it work drastically well for two of my boys. One could not keep his balance on his bicycle to save his life. We did the suggested brain training and taught ‘his hands to stay on his shoulders’ and kaboom, he was biking balanced a minute later!

This book not only helped my kids, but helped me to realize the power of training the mind. Training it to do something that made no sense at all to teach it to do. Something I will later recall, apply, and benefit from in a different scenario at a different level of mind-body training.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

5. The Emotion Code by Dr. Bradley Nelson

This book helped me in several ways. This book, like the NAET book, also talked about muscle testing. It was interesting how deep a person’s subconscious mind could go. It knew when it was emotionally hurt. The body rememberedInteresting. 

If this was true for emotions, why wouldn’t it be true for physical reasons as well? This point stayed in the back of my mind for a season. I wondered. If the body remembers, it remembers. Is it possible for the body to remember everything? We are told this is the case and retrieval is the hard part. (The mind also chooses to forget as I later learned.)

The other benefit from this book was it helped my acupuncture appointments ‘to hold’ longer. Before using the method in this book, I needed to go weekly just to maintain. Afterwards, I was able to stretch it out to once every 3-4 weeks.

It, unfortunately and fortunately, brought to the surface many things I tried to forget for self-preservation. It was a very needed and helpful book.

Interwoven Wisdom Books: A Blog Series Lessons from Einstein: Autoimmune Answers through Irrational Thinking Part 4 of 5

6. Napoleon’s Buttons by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson

This was another book we used in our classic approach to homeschooling. I have gone through this book three times now. Each time I find myself gleaning more from it. I either forgot or understood on a deeper level each time going through. It consisted of a mix of stories and principles. Not a light read, but an enjoyable one. I think the last time going through, I read it as an audio book.

I found it fascinating how molecules (a combination of atoms) could be broken down and by changing just one atom changed everything. It also talked of many examples where they used prior knowledge from ‘old medicine’ to try to duplicate a more reliable supply for market.

This benefited me for when I figured out the method I have coined Altering Fields to Enable Recovery (AFTER). It let me realize a toxin could be broken down into its components and tackle one component at a time in order to manually do the sorting job the body is automatically supposed to be doing (according to my DISH hypothesis.)

Interwoven Wisdom Books: A Blog Series Lessons from Einstein: Autoimmune Answers through Irrational Thinking Part 4 of 5

Conclusion

In summary, the key takeaways I gained from these books I stored in my brain for a season without realizing they were percolating and preparing me to combine them together at a later date. I don’t think I could have figured out my irrational idea without Einstein’s encouragement and these authors.

These key takeaways

  1. Living Gluten Free for Dummies by Danna Korn: A small amount mattered.
  2. The Body’s Many Cries for Water by F. Batmanghelidj, MD.: The answer could be simple.
  3. NAET: Say Good-bye to Your Allergies by Devi S. Nambudripad, MD: It’s all about energy.
  4. The Gift of Dyslexia by Ronald D. Davis and Eldon M. Braun: The mind can be trained.
  5. The Emotion Code by Dr. Bradley Nelson: The body remembers everything.
  6. Napoleon’s Buttons by Penny Le Couteur and  Jay Burreson: Molecules can be broken down.

My next blog post will be the last of the Interwoven Wisdom Books blog series. It will be about the key concept of this automatic mystery sorting system I believe determines whether or not a person has the opportunity to be well.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

Cyndi Whatif
Cyndi Whatif

I am a patient turned author and guide. I share my hypothesis of an overlooked complementary body system which I believe determines whether or not a person has the opportunity to be well.

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