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Lung Meridian in Layman’s Terms: Key Facts for Daily Wellness

For this series of blog posts, my aim is to focus on just the key facts about each meridian and why the information is beneficial to know. I will be starting this blog post about the Lung Meridian.
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NOT Medical Advice. Informational Purposes only. 

Introduction

In order for me to apply my DISH (Defensive Individual Shield Hypothesis) philosophy, I needed to understand my body better. This included body meridians. So for a quick reference, I have made a series of blog posts to address each prime meridian, the governing vessel and the conception vessel. The series is going to go in the same order as the TCM meridian clock, beginning with the lung meridian, and then ending with the governing and conception vessels.  

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

Overview

For this series of blog posts, my aim is to focus on just the key facts about each meridian and why the information is beneficial to know. I will be starting this blog post about the Lung Meridian with a video to show you the path and location of the meridian on the body using an acupuncture mannequin and meridian chart guide. Afterwards, I will share key points I needed to remember when it came to the Lung Meridian.

Video for Location of Lung Meridian

Lung Meridian Key Points

1. the Lung Meridian Connections

  • Element: Metal
  • Season: Autumn
  • Opposite Meridian: Urinary bladder

2. Lung Meridian Clock Time Segment: 3-5 a.m.

According to TCM meridian clock I mentioned in my previous post, Very Beginner’s Understanding of a Meridian Clock, the two-hour time segment dedicated to the Lung Meridian is between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. During this time, our lungs are the primary objective. This is the body’s opportunity to focus on self-cleansing and renewal specifically for the lungs. If I tended to wake up between the hours of 3 to 5 a.m., it was a signal to me that my lungs may require extra attention and care.

3. Accessing the Lung Meridian

a. Acupoints - 11 points

The Lung Meridian has 11 acupoints or specific points along its meridian. I view these points as locations of potential stoplights. If there is energy blockage, weakness, or tenderness near one of these points, I used it as a signal that my lungs and/or lung meridian may need extra care. These points also can be an area where energy can be accessed and balanced. In a nutshell, these points are used to promote lung health.  

b. Other Areas of Interest

There are also other areas of the body that can stimulate the lungs that are not on the primary path of the Lung Meridian.

  • Feet: The ball of both feet are associated with the lungs.
  • Hands: The area on the hands that corresponds to the lungs spans the width of the hand and are located just below where your fingers join to your hand.
  • Teeth: Your teeth are even known to have organs associated with them. For the lungs, they are the teeth numbered 4,5,12,13 for the top and 20, 21, 28, and 29 for the bottom.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

4. Attributes about the Lung Meridian

a. Direction of Flow

The Lung Meridian arises from inside of the human body just below the collarbone. From there, it travels down the arm to the tip of the thumb.

b. Its Partner Meridian

The Lung Meridian is paired with the Large Intestines. Each meridian in the human body has a partner meridian. The Lung and Large Intestine Meridians act together in balancing the fluids and energy in the human body. I noticed having a problem with my lungs could be an indicator that I had a problem with my large intestines as well.

5. Organs Involved with the Lung Meridian

In addition to the lungs, it influences the skin and respiratory passages. The nose along with the sinuses will be clear when the lung meridian has energy traveling efficiently through it. The Lung Meridian, to a lesser extent, has influence on the large intestines because the Large Intestine Meridian is partner to the Lung Meridian.

6. Emotions Associated with the Lung Meridian

In TCM, each meridian is related to specific emotions. Grief and  sadness belong to the Lung Meridian. When these emotions are not addressed, it will cause damage to the lungs. This interaction explains the significant association of our emotional health with our physical well-being. It is believed that keeping ourselves stress-free will keep our lungs healthy.

7. Nutrients Required for the Lung Meridian

Some nutrients are particularly associated with the health of the Lung Meridian. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but it is a good starting point.

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin E
  • Omega-3
  • Magnesium
  • Zinc
  • Selenium
  • Flavonoids
  • Beta-carotene
  • Water

Having a diet that includes a variety of these nutrients will help to energize and fortify the Lung Meridian, enhancing the immune system and defending the respiratory tract against infection and other problems. I frequently referenced the nutrients needed for specific meridians and organs so that I would know what to focus on when it came to applying my DISH philosophy.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

8. Unique Features of the Lung Meridian

One unique feature is that the Lung Meridian is the first of the meridians in the cycle of flow, thus inaugurating the circulation of Qi—energy—in the body. This makes this meridian vital in distributing energy and upholding good health.

9. Imbalance of the Lung Meridian

There are many symptoms expressed when the Lung Meridian is out of balance. These signs show disturbance to the lungs needing aid to get back to balance. Some indications of imbalance in this meridian include:

  • Typical respiratory challenges such as chronic coughing or congestion
  • Shortness of breath or lack of desire to talk
  • Poor growth of nails and hair
  • Dry skin, skin tags, or moles
  • Burning in the nostrils, nasal congestion, nose bleeds, or runny nose
  • Afternoon fever or night sweats, or lack of perspiration
  • On a cellular level mental and emotional symptoms may include self-pity, low self-esteem, comparing self to others, and highly emotionally sensitive  

10. Assisting the Lung Meridian

a. Some Suggestions

I have compiled a list of some methods I have found on the internet for your convenience. It is not meant for medical advice. Some suggestions for the Lung Meridian:

  • You can perform some breathing exercises to strengthen the lungs and allow more oxygen flow.
  • Herbal remedies like ginger, licorice root, and mullein are also used as health-promoting herbs for the lungs.
  • Drinking a lot of water would aid in keeping the respiratory tract moist and hydrated.
  • Foods rich in vitamins A and C can enhance lung functions.
  • Acupressure: Massage the 11 acupoints on the Lung Meridian to ensure that your energy is balanced.

b. Using my DISH Philosophy

For me, I used this information for creating my manual DISH. It gave me the tools I needed for symptom diagnosing and preventative care. I have a blog post here, What is DISH?, that explains the foundation of my philosophy.

Conclusion

Learning about the Lung Meridian and its functions in our bodies can be extremely helpful in the process of staying healthy. If we take note of essential components of the Lung Meridian, such as peak times, related emotions, and nutritional requirements, we can create proactive steps toward supporting our respiratory system. Such simple practices as deep breathing, hydration of the body, and good nutrition will keep the Lung Meridian in balance and therefore bring balance into the whole body.

Be Brave Enough to Take One More Try

I know it sometimes hurts when hoping for something to finally work when struggling with health challenges.  But I want to give you hope anyway.  

References

  1. Vanbuskirk, Sarah. “How Emotions and Organs Are Connected in Traditional Chinese Medicine.” Verywell Mind. Updated on 10 January 2023. https://www.verywellmind.com/emotions-in-traditional-chinese-medicine-88196#:~:text=Symptoms%20of%20lung%20imbalance%3A%20Shortness,skin%2C%20depression%2C%20and%20excessive%20crying
  2. Chin Wan Fung, Peter. “New Insights on Stimulating the Lung Meridian Based on Modern Neurophysiology.” Scientific Research: An Academic Publisher. September 2018. https://www.scirp.org/journal/paperinformation?paperid=85869
  3. Wakefield, Mary Elizabeth “Lung Meridian.” Science Direct. 2014. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/lung-meridian
  1. Nambudripad, Devi S., MD, DC, Lac, PhD (Acu.), NAET: Say Good-Bye to Your Allergies: A Revolutionary Treatment for Allergies and Allergy-Related Conditions (Buena Park, CA: Delta Publishing Company, 2003)
  2. Lian, Yu-Lin; Chen, Chun-Yan; Hammes, Michael; Kolster, Bernard C. Pictorial Atlas of Acupuncture: An illustrated manual of acupuncture points. (Germany, H.F. Ullmann, 2012)
Cyndi Whatif
Cyndi Whatif

I am a patient turned author and guide. I share my hypothesis of an overlooked complementary body system which I believe determines whether or not a person has the opportunity to be well.

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